2020

As always, I’m keeping this short.

2020 is here and I have focal point for the year. My optics are tuned and set on the follow list:

  • Clarity. In my mind and of others. All too often, I’m immediately responding assuming that I understand. Sometimes I don’t. It often comes off as rude or aggressive and it needs to change. This is a joint effort, but at least I will be the one to start the shift among my colleagues.
  • Project management. I enjoy organizing projects, drafting reports on progress and achieving varying levels of progress.
  • CCNP, Python, Ansible. The new CCNP is around the corner. It’s going to involve Networking, DevOps, and Automation. I’m getting it.
  • Action. There’s no waiting. Just acting. I’ll assess all opportunities that come my way, see if they fit with my 5 year and 10 year roadmap and execute on all opportunities that align.
  • Intentionally . Doing the best with full intentions of performing the best I can.

That’s it. I’m really just focusing on key skills, growing professionally as a manager and leader, and chiseling away at progress.

Reflection & Vision

When you’ve reached a peaked plateau in any aspect of your life, it’s easy to feel lost, and fogged. Especially when you’re at a peak – but your internal furnace that drives for growth and learning beyond your current levels continues to beg the question; what’s next? It’s common for people my age to want more – and more constantly. It’s often referred as greed. And the definition may be accurate with that statement. I’ll debate it later.

It’s not a bad place to be and I realize this. I’ve had mentors, father figures and friends refer to this point in life as many different things. All of which have resulted in complacency, losing businesses, or failing on their part of the deal in partnerships. That’s where I was earlier this year. I was at my turning point. A point in time where I could choose to make a change. It would either result in returning to Port, maintaining my anchor or setting sail for the high seas.

My decision? Well, none of the above. I overthink everything. I decided to come back to basics. Develop a strategy that will ensure my success – long term, expand on my foundation, and then embark on my journey.

So, I’m in the middle of developing key skills that will last me another decade in this vastly dynamic world of technology. Being a network and systems specialist is only a fraction of who I really am and even of that percent that I am, I can still be greater.

Skill #1 Systems & Networking – I’ll spend time learning Cloud infrastructure from a technical stance. Mastering understanding from a top level managerial view down to the cleanest whitepapers written by the creators of these technologies. Wikipedia is not a proper source.

Skill #2 Management – I’ll spend time learning how to encourage natural incentive and effort for a common strategic goal.

Skill #3 Leadership – being prepared and present more frequently in meetings. I’m already good at this, but I’ll be even better. Providing more follow up and follow through on projects and goals. Creating an environment of care and compassion among my peers and colleagues.

Skill #4 Entrepreneurship – I’ll work on my partnerships. Creating strategic partnerships that truly benefit both sides with sustainability in mind.

Skill #5 Personal – removing limiting thoughts and hesitation from my mental reflex. Preparing to be a father and a better husband with every opportunity.


I think it’s important to understand why I chose skills rather than certifications for my goals. Having an understanding of your desired skill will remove the limiting factors of choosing a single cert and believing that it’s all you need. In reality, I must master my skills, which may equate to five certs, 400 hours of video lessons and another 10 years of experience. The later is much more appealing and hard to beat, especially when competing against a team of nerds, a processor and code for future jobs. It also empowers me to go out, gather the best data on the subjects and study them to a mastery level – then apply what I’ve learned to be truly great.